Careers Liaison

Published on 09/05/2017

CLT Mission Statement

The Mission of the CLT will be to identify those cadets who have already expressed a desire to join the Armed Forces and, in liaison with the Armed Forces Careers Office, utilise in house expertise to provide coaching, mentoring and support as required, to ensure that they are able to demonstrate their full potential to the Recruitment Staff.

Careers Liaison Memorandum

To email your Careers Liaison Team lead please click on the relevant link:

CLT Contact 1

CLT Contact 2

CLT Contact 3

CLT Contact 4

CLT Contact 5

CLT Contact 6

Navy Careers Logo
The Royal Navy Website is the most up to date source of information on what you require to do to join as a Royal Navy or Royal Marines Commando Officer.

CLT-RNO-Contact    CLT-RMCO-Contact


The Careers Liaison Team can offer advice and support throughout the process of joining as an officer. More useful information is available below:

As part of the Admiralty Interview Board assessment you will be required to write a short essay from a variety of areas ranging from politics and current affairs to the Naval Service and Values. The purpose of the essay is to see how you are able to express yourself in your writing and how you can argue a point of view.

You will have 45 minutes to plan, type up your essay on a computer and review your work! Be concise, don’t waffle and make sure you read what you have written (use the spell checker!!).

Don’t forget the basics of essay writing; it has a beginning, middle and an end – ‘Tell what you are going to tell me’ in the Introduction; ‘Tell me’ in the main body and ‘Tell me what you’ve told me’ in the conclusion!

If you want to a bit of practise just drop us an email here and we’ll discuss your needs and give you all the support you need.

  • At AIB, you will be required to take part in a planning exercise with the other members of your syndicate. You will be given a written scenario to review for 15 minutes prior to being called into the Board Room.
  • Once seated you will briefed on a problem which you will be required to solve with your other team members. You will then be given 15 minutes to identify the aims, discuss the problem and formulate a plan. Your team will then be asked to brief their aims and plan, after which each candidate is questioned in turn on the scenario and plan.
  • Once this phase is complete all candidates are sent out of the room for 2 minutes to review, and if required, amend their plan, before being called back into the Board Room individually to brief their final plan.
  • Be confident in your abilities.
  • Pick out the key points and key individuals in the plan
  • Think team!
  • Speak loudly and clearly so the Board can hear you – if they can’t hear you they can’t assess you!!
  • If you are confident, take on the role of Chairman – that doesn’t mean doing all the talking, but making sure that everyone gets the chance to speak.
  • DON’T talk over the other candidates
  • Remember that you are NOT in competition with the other people on your Board. Working together as team can produce a much better result for all of you!
As part of the Admiralty Interview Board you will have to take part in a number of Practical Leadership Tasks (between 4-5 depending on your syndicate size).

On the first day you will be shown around the gym where you will conduct the PLT and be given a comprehensive brief on how to safely use the equipment and be given the opportunity to have a practise run, or two.

You will then be given your individual task which you will be assessed on at the Board and have the opportunity to create your plan.

On the day of the Board the first PLT you will complete will be a ‘Leaderless’ task where you will be given 30 seconds to review the task before you. You will then have 8 minutes to try to complete the task. Once that is complete you will each be given the opportunity to lead your own assessed PLT.

Some points to take onboard:

  • Pay attention to the safety brief – failure to carry out the correct procedures during your task will cost you time!!
  • Know your task! An 8 feet long plan will not bridge an 8 feet gap as it will need to rest on side of the bridge.
  • If your task has you ‘taking your team and an item of kit from Platform A to Platform B and then returning to Platform A’ make sure you know how to get back from Platform B to A. Many people overlook this important part of the task.
  • Make sure you give a full and detailed brief; you have 8 minutes to brief and complete your task. 20-30 seconds spent briefing your plan to the team could save you 2 minutes at the end when your team are unaware of your plan.
  • Be LOUD!! The gym is massive and the Board are all old and deaf!! Make sure they can hear you; if they can’t hear you they might miss the pearl of complete wisdom you have just uttered!
  • Be a good team member for the other candidates as you are marks on that as much as your own task.
  • Show lots of enthusiasm, lots of support for your other team members and instil a sense of urgency…move fast, but safe
  • Most importantly... HAVE FUN!!
To do well, and importantly do yourself justice, at interview you need to set aside some time to ensure that you are fully prepared. This will involve giving the day some thought and preparing your answers to the possible questions you might get asked. That way you can be sure to give the best and most appropriate answer to the majority of questions, rather than snatching at the first thing that comes to mind.

Click on the links below for more information:

  • ‘Clothes maketh the Man’. What you wear says a lot about how you want others to perceive you. It goes without saying that smart dress and polished shoes go a long way to making that all important first impression!
  • Consider wearing a suit, or jacket and trousers as a minimum. Dark sober colours are ideal.
  • The joke tie you received as a Christmas gift is probably not the best bet! You’re trying look professional after all!
  • As a Cadet you will already carry yourself in a Military way; standing up straight, shoulders back and an unconscious air of confidence.
  • Continue that in the interview; sit up straight, don’t slouch; sit comfortably, but not overly relaxed; head up; control your hands – avoid resting your hand on your chin, no picking your nose, etc.
  • Look the interviewer in the eye when you are talking. That doesn’t mean ‘stare the interviewer out’, but try to naturally engage with the interviewer.
  • Eye contact helps to builds a rapport between the interviewer and interviewee and this is important in ensuring that you are able to relax and perform at your best.
  • Good, clear, confident voice. This doesn’t mean your best Parade Ground Voice. Try to speak in the same way which you would speak to family members; that means in a variable tone, not a dull and boring monotone, try not to speak too fast and ensure that your diction is clear.
  • Be friendly to your interviewer, but be careful not to be overly familiar. A little bit of humour is always welcome, but make sure that it is appropriate.  If you’re unsure, then don’t use it (think, would I say this to my Nan?).
Don’t be afraid of a small period of silence during the interview. It is natural that you may need a second or two to think of an appropriate answer. Four or five seconds can seem like an eternity, but don’t worry about it. It is better to compose yourself properly, rather than rush to the first thing that comes to mind.
You have earned the right to be interviewed and your background with the VCC should give you the confidence that you can perform well at the interview. Draw on this to ensure that you leave the interviewer in no doubt that you are the person they are looking to recruit!!
  • Why do you want to join?
  • Why Officer?
  • Why do you want to go into your chosen branch?
  • What research have you done?
  • What is the training pipeline?
  • What will you do in your first job?
  • Where is the Naval Service operating around the World?
  • What does your family and friends think of your career choice?
…..etc, etc.
  • What is Moral Courage and when have you displayed it?
  • When has something gone wrong and how did you deal with it?
  • Have you ever made a mistake which has affected others?
  • What are you committed to? (easy…VCC)
  • When have you taken a risk?
  • Difficult conversation?
  • Greatest achievement?
  • Overcoming problems?
….and many, many similar style questions.

Above all be honest!. Don’t make up an answer as the Board will see through it!

 
The Royal Navy Website is the most up to date source of information on what you require to do to join as a Royal Navy or Royal Marines Commando Officer.

CLT-RNRM-Careers

 
The Careers Liaison Team can offer advice and support throughout the process of joining as an officer. More useful information is available below:

You will be required to complete the Naval Service Recruiting test as part of the application process. The NSRT will test your powers of Reasoning, Verbal Ability, Numeracy and Mechanical Comprehension. Success will prove your suitability for a career in the Naval Service; however, the pass mark will be dependent on the branch you are joining.

More information and an online practise test can be found on the Royal Navy at the Royal Navy website here.

The CLT will arrange for the local AFCO to visit the Unit a few times per year where there will be an opportunity to conduct a practise Recruit Test.

If successful the Pass will remain valid for 3 years; however, if unsuccessful it will not count towards the two attempts allowed at the careers office and will simply provide a useful insight into the test.  Bit of a ‘no brainer’ really!

To do well, and importantly do yourself justice, at interview you need to set aside some time to ensure that you are fully prepared. This will involve giving the day some thought and preparing your answers to the possible questions you might get asked. That way you can be sure to give the best and most appropriate answer to the majority of questions, rather than snatching at the first thing that comes to mind.

Click on the links below for more information:

  • ‘Clothes maketh the Man’. What you wear says a lot about how you want others to perceive you. It goes without saying that smart dress and polished shoes go a long way to making that all important first impression!
  • Consider wearing a suit, or jacket and trousers as a minimum. Dark sober colours are ideal.
  • The joke tie you received as a Christmas gift is probably not the best bet! You’re trying look professional after all!
  • As a Cadet you will already carry yourself in a Military way; standing up straight, shoulders back and an unconscious air of confidence.
  • Continue that in the interview; sit up straight, don’t slouch; sit comfortably, but not overly relaxed; head up; control your hands – avoid resting your hand on your chin, no picking your nose, etc.
  • Look the interviewer in the eye when you are talking. That doesn’t mean ‘stare the interviewer out’, but try to naturally engage with the interviewer.
  • Eye contact helps to builds a rapport between the interviewer and interviewee and this is important in ensuring that you are able to relax and perform at your best.
  • Good, clear, confident voice. This doesn’t mean your best Parade Ground Voice. Try to speak in the same way which you would speak to family members; that means in a variable tone, not a dull and boring monotone, try not to speak too fast and ensure that your diction is clear.
  • Be friendly to your interviewer, but be careful not to be overly familiar. A little bit of humour is always welcome, but make sure that it is appropriate.  If you’re unsure, then don’t use it (think, would I say this to my Nan?).
Don’t be afraid of a small period of silence during the interview. It is natural that you may need a second or two to think of an appropriate answer. Four or five seconds can seem like an eternity, but don’t worry about it. It is better to compose yourself properly, rather than rush to the first thing that comes to mind.
You have earned the right to be interviewed and your background with the VCC should give you the confidence that you can perform well at the interview. Draw on this to ensure that you leave the interviewer in no doubt that you are the person they are looking to recruit!!
  • This will be a general chat about your background; where you grew up; family; relationship with Mum, Dad, Siblings; friends.
  • They will be looking for information about your home life, family support for your application and to make sure you're not running away to sea!
The interviewer will want to gain an overview of your time at school.   This will not just be your exam results, but what you did at school; sports teams; roles at school - Prefect, etc.; relationship with teachers.

Think about all of the positives and major on those. Don't draw attention to negative points unless you can put a positive spin on them, i.e. 'this was a bad time or didn't go well, but I learned this..’, or ‘I wasn’t a good enough footballer to make the school team, but I was able to use my fitness to take part in the VCC Field Gun completion / swimming gala…..’, etc.

What you have done since school. They will be looking for evidence of your work ethic; your ability to work on your own and as part of a team; relationship with your supervisor.

Also think about problems you've encountered and how you handled them. This could be with other workers (have you had to stick up you someone or show moral courage), or an issue you have had to work through. 

The VCC will obviously play a major part in this section. Think about all you have done and what you do now – THERE IS A LOT!!!!.

DO NOT assume the interviewer knows anything about the VCC!! Describe what you do as you would to someone you have just met who has never heard of the VCC; think ‘Janet and John’ speak!

The VCC shows commitment, leadership, teamwork, camaraderie, personal responsibility and reliability - all characteristics that the Services are looking for. Think about your best examples. 

There are many possible questions the interviewer could ask to identify your motivation for joining the RN/RM.

Here are some to think about:

  • Why do you want to be in the Royal Navy / Royal Marines?
  • What have you done to find out about what the Naval Service does?
  • What will you do in the RN/RM? What roles are available to you?
  • What is the role of the Royal Navy/Royal Marines?
  • What Units are there?
  • Where do the RN/RM serve; which ships could you serve in?
  • What are your ambitions?
  • How long will you be required to serve for?
  • RM motto, RN/RM history, etc.
  • What do you think the hardest thing you will undergo in training and how will you prepare for it?